Keystone XL Truth

pipeline-bwI wrote here recently about Tom Steyer and his mission to stop the pipeline.  He, along with Bill McKibben, 350.org, the Sierra Club, and a growing universe of activists are building what we all hope is an inarguable case against the pipeline and the tar sands.  We are trying to make the movement against KXL inexorable.

Here is the first of Tom Steyer’s video spots, airing nationally, against the pipeline and the tar sands.  For more, go to Keystone Truth and to Steyer’s NextGen Climate Action.

Don’t believe Tom Steyer?  How about 21 Nobel peace and science laureates?  They’re against the tar sands too and want the EU to immediately implement its Fuel Quality Directive.  This would ban tar sands oil from Europe.


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Stop the Keystone XL

WebI’ve written here a number of times about the Alberta tar sands and the Keystone XL, and going back a few years as well at my old Foreign Policy Association blog.  Ryan Lizza, a great political analyst and writer, wrote a fascinating update recently at The New Yorker:  The President and the Pipeline.  Not only does Lizza bring us up to date on the politics of the pipeline, but he profiles one of the key players in the mix today:  Tom Steyer.  Steyer is an activist with a difference – he’s got financial resources and many like-minded friends with similar resources.  He’s got the ear of President Obama.  He’s an increasingly influential force in Democratic party politics.  He also founded the Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance at Stanford Law School, along with his equally high-powered wife, Kat Taylor.  (I interviewed the executive director there, Dan Reicher, for my book, when Dan was still at Google.)  Steyer is, in short, somebody I’m glad to have in my foxhole with me. Continue reading


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“Stop KXL” in New York (and The New Yorker)

KXL and BofA TowerLast week, there was a rally and March in New York City to send yet-another message to President Obama that the Keystone XL pipeline is a bad idea for the U.S. and for the planet.  This picture juxtaposes two things of which we need more:  loud and focused activism on climate change and superb green buildings like the Bank of America Tower.  I’ve written here a few times about the KXL project.  I’ve also had the privilege of interviewing one of the architects of the BofA Tower, Bob Fox, for my book.  This building is also known as One Bryant Park and is one of the most advanced green buildings of its size in the world.

The salience of the opposition to the Keystone XL project is growing.  One more indication is Elizabeth Kolbert’s eloquent essay in this week’s New Yorker: Lines in the Sand.

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